Groton EMS Donation

On November 26 Joan Reynolds, former member of the Groton EMS, presented 20 Red Cross Emergency Preparedness kits to Groton Police Chief/Director of Emergency Services, Chief Donald Palma.  Joan and her family funded the purchase of the kits through the collaborative efforts of the Groton Council On Aging and Friends of Groton Elders.  They will be kept on hand by the Groton PD, Groton EMS and COA to be distributed to residents in the event of a disaster.

 

Pictured Left to right:
Stacey Shepard Jones COA Outreach Coordinator
Marie Melican, Friends of the Groton Elders President
Joan Reynolds, Project Benefactor
Groton Police Chief Donald Palma,
Erica Reynolds Hager, Project Benefactor
Kathy Shelp, COA Director
Groton Police LT. James CullenGrotonSafety

NRWA Afterschool Program

Nashua River Watershed offers “Stories in the Snow”, an Afterschool Tracking Program for Children

Winter animals tell their tales of adventure and survival through the signs they leave behind: footprints, chew marks, food middens, and even scat!  During the month of January, Nashua River Watershed Association’s Eco-Adventure Afterschool Series led by River Classroom Director Stacey Chilcoat explores the exciting world of animal tracking. Children ages 9 to 12 will learn how to identify some of our most common animal neighbors by their footprints, hike the local trails looking for signs of activity, make plaster castings of animal footprints, play animal games and create their own personal pocket tracking guide to take home.  After a cold adventurous outdoor activity, we will come inside to share Native American stories while sipping on a warm cup of cocoa.  Don’t miss out on this exciting series!

This program will meet on Wednesdays, January 7, 14, 21, and 28, 2015, from 3:30 – 5:30 p.m., at the NRWA River Resource Center, 592 Main Street in Groton, MA.  Program fee: $100/ NRWA members, $125/non-members; siblings will receive a 25% discount.  It is open to children ages 9 to 12 from all communities.  Space is limited, reservations required. To register, or for more information, please contact NRWA River Classroom Director Stacey Chilcoat at (978) 448-0299, or email StaceyC@NashuaRiverWatershed.org.  The NRWA is a non-profit environmental organization that depends on memberships for support.

Jeff Breen poses for a photo after his first day in business on Wednesday, October 8th, 2014.

The 1950s Live at Breen’s Diner in Pepperell!

The 1950s Live at Breen’s Diner in Pepperell!

In the location formerly occupied by Pepperell Spa at 170 Main St. is now Breen’s Diner. The interior underwent complete renovations from newly installed checkered flooring to soda fountains, jukebox and 1950s Coca-Cola beverage display cooler, replete with large authentic images of Pepperell from the ’50s. All this completed by owner, cook and entrepreneur Jeff Breen (and his father), whose family has been in Pepperell for at least five generations. Everything is in a 1950s motif right down to the attire of cooks and waitstaff. 

Jeff Breen poses for a photo after his first day in business on Wednesday, October 8th, 2014.
This new business had what was planned as a soft opening in October, though the former popularity of the spot and quickly spread word of the great food, friendly service and enticingly authentic and pleasant atmosphere foiled any hopes of a gentle build-up in business. Almost immediately Jeff was looking to hire more waitstaff and a cook. 
What’s best is the food quality has remained consistently outstanding since opening.

A special request, the Big Bopper with the Irish Benny, a freshly baked walnut and cranberry muffin and apple and cranberry juice mixed on the spot.
A special request, the Big Bopper with the Irish Benny, a freshly baked walnut and cranberry muffin and apple and cranberry juice mixed on the spot.

At Breen’s Diner everything is made fresh without exception but let’s allow the pictures to speak their thousand words. 

Golden Fried Haddock on special for $7.99 with a combination of fresh cut fries and chips along with coleslaw and tartar sauce made on the premises.
Golden Fried Haddock on special for $7.99 with a combination of fresh cut fries and chips along with coleslaw and tartar sauce made on the premises.

World War II Victory Garden Program

World War II Victory Garden Program at Fort Devens Museum

What was it like to feed a household of hungry people during World War II? What could a citizen do at home to keep a family healthy and help the war effort?

These questions are the focus in the Saturday, October 18, 2014, afternoon program at Fort Devens Museum: Victory Gardens: How a Nation of Vegetable Gardeners Helped to Win the War . The scene in this particular presentation, to start at 1 p.m., shifts away from battle scenes and stories of those engaged directly in fighting war to those back home, behind-the-scenes yet involved in their way too. Area residents are invited to come find answers to these questions at the Museum, located at 94 Jackson Road on Devens.

Guest speaker for this program will be Botanist Judith Sumner, who “specializes in ethnobotany, flowering plants, plant adaptation, and garden history,” as she states in her biographical profile. Her program will be primarily about victory gardens in the United States and England during WWII. She plans to direct some attention also, she says, to “ration book cookery with its strong emphasis on vegetables and then [relate] a bit about the wider role of plants in fighting the war.”

Sumner has been gathering material for and writing a botanical history of World War II, tentatively entitled Plants Go to War: A Botanical History of World War II. Previously she wrote American Household Botany, which received the American Horticultural Society Book Award in 2005. A graduate of Vassar College, she completed graduate studies in botany at University of Massachusetts-Amherst and has also studied in England at Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and the British Museum. She has taught at colleges and botanical gardens and worked with teachers and those seeking to improve their science writing skills. In addition, she has made many appearances on television, lectured before horticultural organizations, and written a magazine column on gardening called “The Gardner’s Kitchen.”

So, what role might plants have played in World War II?  To find out, visit the Museum on October 18th.  The museum is open from 10 AM to 3 PM that day and the program will be held at 1 PM. The Fort Devens Museum is located on the 3rd floor at 94 Jackson Road, Devens, MA. The museum is wheelchair accessible. For more information please call 978-772-1286 or email info@fortdevensmuseum.org.  This program is free and open to the public but donations are encouraged.

Free in the Nashoba Valley